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Author Topic: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread  (Read 7382 times)

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graiz

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2012, 08:18:37 am »
Yep, I tried really hard to get over the fear for the prison level and just couldn't do it. Put it down and now it's not even installed anymore on my new build. I may start over some day, but it was significantly more frightening than anything I've ever seen.

Jafaelo

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2012, 08:47:55 am »
Tampon delivery for Graiz and Gerudox!  Where should I put this crate of vag plugs, fellas?



I kid, I kid.

id

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2012, 09:01:14 am »
All joking aside, have you played it? I wouldn't be so quick to judge if you haven't - I haven't even played it and I don't really want to. Some of the videos are enough to get my heart going just thinking about it.

This is a funny video, though.

Amnesia: The Dark Descent HD - Funny scaried player -

id

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #18 on: July 05, 2012, 09:20:05 am »
Honestly, I could probably review this game without even having played it, because being the particular breed of vagina that I am, I've watched other people play it enough that I've probably seen the whole thing anyway. Not really the same thing as playing it, I suppose, but still; if the game is so scary that I nearly refuse to play it, that says something. It's kind of funny, though, because I pretty much did this exact same thing with Resident Evil 4. I was going to a friends house every other day or so just to hang out and he was always playing this, so I'm pretty sure I saw the entirety of that game too. I'm not a big "scary game" fan - I prefer to keep my shit booked for proper evacuation.

The only detractor I can think of is that the majority of the game is auditory, and non-threatening visualizations... which isn't really a detractor, because it does it's job. Hell, at some point you may start getting used to the "Oh, scary sound, probably nothing there" feeling and then when you least expect it, something actually is there, which I think is a pretty clever thing to do.

I don't know if you guys have heard of the Zero Punctuation reviews done by a guy called Yahtzee. If you haven't, check them out. He sums up my thoughts on this game pretty well;

"It isn't a perfect game, but it's almost unmatched as a constipation aid".

----------------------------

Alright, I had the chance, so I decided to play this a bit. It's creepy, no doubt about it, but it's the type of game that I think works better on people who have no idea what it's about. I played for about an hour and a half, got through a couple of the zones, found my first part of this acid thing, but hadn't run into any of the guys yet. Most of the time, I knew what to expect - not that I had seen a lot of the shit before, because I hadn't - but I just had this gut feeling that the game was out to get me from the get go, and I was always careful when I heard a sound that sounded like a guy. I even went so far as to build forts out of barrels, so if something *did* come by, I had a great spot to run to and hide if I needed it.

However, while I think it's a great atmosphere and shit, I found it kind of boring. I almost quit playing it at one point because I'm not very big into puzzles and I couldn't figure this shit out quick enough to keep my interest. I ended up finding it and played more after that, but this really isn't my type of game. Not that it's a bad game, but I don't have the patience for this type of shit. I don't like to think to much about solving riddles or whatever, I just like straightforward "this is what you do" stuff. Not that puzzles are a bad thing, cause I have some pretty good memories with a lot of the Lucas Arts adventure games, but I'd rather stick to shit I know I'm interested in.

Maybe it sounds like I'm pussying out or something, but here's a fact; the most fun I had in that game was building my barrel fort and making it perfect, several levels high with a good entry point blocked by a barrel (that you had to jump over) and a little corner inside the fort to duck behind. That should say something about the type of person I am.

Also, the story did nothing for me either. Most of the shit I found that I had to read I just ended up skipping. The most annoying thing was getting stopped in a room, being blinded by this headache inducing white light (because it recommended I play in the dark with headphones, which I did), and being forced to listen to this shit. I'm usually really in to story, too.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2012, 06:31:55 pm by id »

id

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #19 on: July 05, 2012, 10:58:59 am »
This may be more towards that nostalgia side of things, so this game probably won't be for everyone.

The Elder Scrolls: Daggerfall

Elder Scrolls 2: Daggerfall Walkthrough - Part 1 - First Dungeon


There are 5 games in the series, in case you didn't know; Arena, Daggerfall, Morrowind, Oblivion and Skyrim (released in that order), and then a few spinoff games; Battlespire, Redguard, and maybe another one or two that I can't remember. The series really hit it big with Daggerfall, but it wasn't until Morrowind that the game nabbed a huge audience and truly turned it into a success.

There are two types of people in the world; those that started with Arena/Daggerfall, and then those that started with Morrowind (obviously the bigger of the two groups). This causes a lot of discussion and argument over which is the better in the series, and a lot of people point at the inferior graphics of the first two (which are pretty much the same) as being the biggest detractor, and then the misssing content of Morrowind and beyond that composes the other side. Even with the gameplay being a little bit on the primitive side and not nearly as up to date or in depth as the future releases, it still holds a special place in my heart for being a type of survival-horror RPG in ways that aren't typically considered survival-horror at all.

For instance; certain creatures in Daggerfall are unable to be killed with certain weapons. This was, sort of, reflected in Morrowind and beyond, but not at this level. At the very beginning of the game, as you see in the video, you run into an Imp who is unable to be killed by anything less than a steel weapon (basically, Iron is the only thing less quality than steel), so that presents a significant problem for the unprepared (but not for the guy in the video, since in his history choices, he receives an ebony dagger - more on that later), and this gets worse as you get farther in the game. Similarly, Vampires are unable to be hurt by anything less than Silver, and certain types of ghosts have special needs as well. This is a lot like D&D where a certain level of enchantment on the weapon was also required to hit higher level creatures (anywhere from +1 to +5), so you can see where they got that idea from - it's pretty typical of oldschool RPG's. This is one of what I think makes Daggerfall more on the survivor-side series of games, because preparation for what lies beyond becomes a priority.

Secondly, dungeons are randomly generated and can be confusing as all hell. They attempted to create a 3D environment (with varying success), so dungeons can have many levels to it - up, down and all around - along with traps and other shit. You have a map, but it can be somewhat hard to read, and therein lies the second problem; not knowing what is in the dungeon can set you up for failure (if you don't have the required weapon to kill what's inside), and since these fuckers are so confusing at times, getting lost or stuck can be a common occurrence. Going in a dungeon is pretty much how you would expect exploring something you've never seen before, with a map drawn by a 2 year old that is pretty much squiggly line with an "x marks the spot" ending point. Your memory will be a much bigger asset than what you're given to navigate it. And let's not kid around here; the dungeons in this game can be fucking MASSIVE.

With both of those being said, the cherry on top is that every creature in the game has a certain sound it makes, so it makes identifying what's around you and what to expect a little bit easier. However, dungeons have a lot of secret doors, and walls do not hide the sounds, so you can be wandering around looking for something when you all of a sudden hear a creature you know you cannot kill (if you even know what the fuck it is to begin with) - and you don't know where the fuck it's at until it jumps on you. Having to backtrack through several levels of dungeon to get away can happen. This is what I think makes this game scary for the uninitiated.

For the story; Arena, Daggerfall, Morrowind and Oblivion all take place during the "Third Era" (or 3E), which is roughly 433 years long, and is marked by the rule of the Emperors and the Empire (of which you see the end of going from Oblivion -> Skyrim). Arena takes place at 3E 399, Daggerfall at 402, Morrowind at 427, and Oblivion at 433. Skyrim takes place in the "Fourth Era", at around 4E 201 - so, basically, around 200 years after Oblivion.

So, on to Daggerfall...

Daggerfall has to do with the assassination of the King of Daggerfall, of which the Emperor sends you to investigate since they were close friends. His ghost haunts the streets of Daggerfall at night (which will have you shitting your pants the first time you arrive there and experience it) and you need to find out why. From the moment you leave the starter dungeon, however, the game is just like any other TES game; you can do whatever the fuck you want with no time limit. The world is a large place, bigger than what you might expect for a game this old (over 10,000 randomly generated cities, towns, dungeons and other locales), and covers what would seem like a very large portion of southern High Rock (where Daggerfall, one of the main cities of High Rock, is and home to Bretons and Orcs) and the surrounding area, which includes a bit of Hammerfell (home of the Redguards). When you see the map of this area, you'll start to wonder why the fuck Morrowind, Oblivion and Skyrim are so damn small (for obvious reasons, but it's a point of contention among purists).

The game has a lot of odd little side things that games of the future got away from - stuff that may seem mundane and not very fun, such as having to ask for directions from people in the towns to find particular places. Cities are large, and when you visit one for the first time, you will be overwhelmed by its size. When you get a quest to find someone at his home, you will have to talk to one of probably a thousand people that walk the streets in that city to get directions to his house. Ask that person enough times in a nice way, or ask enough people in general, and they'll mark the location on your map (which you can also mark if you want to take note of something). Other areas of interest, like shops, can be found in the same way, but for the most part, points of particular interest, such as temples, inns, guilds and shops are already color coded, so they are a lot easier to find right off the bat. When you do a quest for a guild, for instance, you may get one that says "go defeat this monster that's locked in this guys' attic". You go outside, find some people to talk to and get the location marked, head there and go inside, and then find your way around his house to locate the beast. Simple. You'll get used to how everything works the more you play it.

Aside from the above, you'll also need to find particular cities or towns at points. When you look at the world map and click on a district, you'll bring up every place of interest there. You can filter these, such as removing the dungeons from the map, the towns, the cities or the temples. However, there could easily be a hundred or more towns or cities, and each one is pretty much just a pixel or two in length, so finding a specific location is not easy by itself. You are given a search option though, and as long as you spell the name of the location correctly, it'll light it up and ask you if you want to travel there.

Let's get to character creation...

When you start a game, you're given the option of choosing a premade character template, creating a new character from scratch, or going ahead with the "questions" that best determine what kind of premade class you want to play. The questions were given to you in limited form in Morrowind, so if you've played that, you know what to expect. Creating a new character is the highlight of this game, though. You are able to choose 3 Primary, 3 Major and 6 Minor skills. Your primary skills will get a hefty bonus to skill level, so this should be shit you use all the time (such as your preferred weapon). Your major skills are there to supplement your primary skills, and should normally be something that defines who you are (such as lockpicking if you want to be a thief). Your minor skills are whatever else you want to throw in to help round you out. You don't really have to follow any particular scheme, though. You'll probably need to play the game for a few hours to get a rough idea of what to expect and how to create a good character, but once you got the basics down, you can craft pretty much any type of character you want with no real limitation.

In addition to the skills, you can choose some special "abilities", things that are beyond the norm of regular people, such as regeneration, modifying your magic pool and resistances to magic. There are also disadvantages that can be thrown in, such as weakness to certain magic or other limitations to your character. These are here for a reason; there is bar that determines how powerful your character is. If you've chosen some godlike abilities, the bar goes up. If you don't choose any, it stays about in the middle. And if you decide to add a weakness with no strengths, it goes down. This determines how fast your character levels. In theory, it doesn't really matter. If you want to level a lot and get to the harder creatures quicker (since it's fairly level-based encounters), you make sure the bar is low. If you want to be an uber character and play for awhile with no weaknesses, just pile on the shit - but know, it takes a long time to level that way, in which case the game might get boring since you'll be unable to advance the main quest effectively until you're the appropriate level. Certain guild quests can also be a lot more difficult.

After you set up your character sheet, you're given a bunch of randomly generated history questions that further define who your character is and his affiliations with the various factions (such as nobility, shopkeepers or peasants, each of which will treat you better or worse). Plus, as in the case of the video above, you'll be able to pick up some items to start your journey, such as an ebony dagger, or a suit of armor, even some dumb shit like a book (which technically isn't dumb because the books are pretty well written and a good read if you give a shit).

Speaking of books, there is one book that I've always found funny in Daggerfall. It's called "The Real Barenziah", and documents the misadventures of Barenziah, a noble and important figure in the series (she is present in one of the games, I believe in Morrowind or Oblivion... fuck, I don't remember). Anyway, there is a lot of graphic sex in the book. And actually, Daggerfall features nudity on both characters and creatures, and there are even sex cults of witches and temple goers. So, now you know.

The things that really got to people about the later incarnations of the Elder Scrolls series was that quite a few things were taken out for awhile. Riding horses and using horse carts to store loot was here, using banks to store gold and gather interest or take out loans, and owning property, such as houses and ships. It took awhile for this stuff to make it back in to the series, and knowing that it was here may put it all into a little perspective when talking about the Daggerfall/Morrowind schism (and nudity being taken out of the game(s) was a big issue, too).

All in all, this game is a great RPG. Not perfect, because it is certainly old, and it was buggy at the time. But, if you can past all that and give it a try, you might like it. There is a lot of freedom here that was taken away later. If anything, if you want to see what the precursor to Skyrim is, load this one up. Hell, I think Bethesda was giving it away for free at one point.

Here's a video that does some of the things I was talking about to give you a little more of an idea how the game plays.

Daggerfall: Dark Brotherhood Quest #2


Some notes;

The guys name "Dies-in-Mud" is pretty funny. That's typically how an Argonian name is (like "Skink-in-tree"). I thought it was funny. The game also runs like shit on his computer when he was in those houses - it's not always like that.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2012, 02:18:20 pm by id »

GerudoX

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #20 on: July 05, 2012, 11:14:26 am »
What makes Amnesia so effective is the sound design.  Throw some headphones on and crank it up, it will make you jump. 




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"Let's look at Paul Allen's card."
"Look at that subtle off-white coloring. The tasteful thickness of it. Oh my God, he even has a watermark."

id

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #21 on: July 05, 2012, 11:55:40 am »
Just added a good video for Daggerfall that I wanted to make sure everyone saw if they were interested in seeing more of it.

id

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #22 on: July 05, 2012, 01:03:50 pm »
Mount & Blade

Mount&Blade Warband Gamescom trailer


I love this game. Another one of those fairly unknown sleeper hits that are pretty much applauded by the people that take the time to try it. This is mostly a medieval combat RPG. There are some quests and a story to, sort of, follow, but the entire point of the game is to make a character, join a faction, and then wage war on the other factions. But still, you don't need to join a faction. You can start your own if you want to, or help one of the many "displaced" kings or queens and take back their country for them. There is a multiplayer aspect to it as well, but I'll just stick with the single player - I prefer that a lot more.

Like I said, game starts out with a rather rudimentary character creator. You basically choose your gender and face, and then you're able to pick a background story that helps mold out your character - it's not really that important. Once you get in to the game, you're free to do whatever you want. You're a mercenary with no allegiance, and there are 6 kingdoms in the Warband expansion, each with their own unique troops and unique style based on one from history. These are;

Kingdom of Swadia; they represent your typical feudal kingdom and have a lot in common with German or English knights and architecture. They have a love of heavy infantry and cavalry.

Kingdom of Rhodoks; they represent a more rough style than the Swadians, though they are along the same lines. They have more in common with kingdoms like Portugal, Sicily or Genoa - feudal kingdoms in their own right, but not nearly as rich or imposing. They are fond of spears and crossbows.

Kingdom of Vaegirs; they represent eastern medieval Europe, like the Rus. They have a mix of different types of troops, both foot and horse.

Kingdom of Nords; obviously, they represent the Scandanavian kingdoms like Norway and Sweden. They only have foot infantry, but they are some of the strongest.

Khergit Khanate; they represent steppe hordes like the Mongols. Almost all of their troops ride a horse, but they are all fairly weak when compared to heavy cavalry from Swadia or other more defensive soldiers. They fight in a hit and run style, riding in circles and peppering troops with arrows and quick attacks (which can be difficult - I'll explain later).

Sarranid Sultanate; they represent the Muslim world. They have a mix of infantry and cavalry, and the only other heavy cavalry that can rival the Swadians.

There's a run down of the factions. Your character can join any of the factions, rise through the ranks and be rewarded land and titles for doing well. At its core, that's what the game is about, and nothing more. There is no deep story, it's just a constant simulation of 6 kingdoms duking it out eternally. Sometimes they make peace when one faction is at war with too many other factions and would rather focus on one, and sometimes they don't have the choice and they get picked apart. At any rate, a game can last a long time if you aren't actively participating, as the AI typically fights a bunch of skirmishes and maybe captures some land before peace is called.

Just to describe what it's like;

Say I make a character and I decide to join Swadia. Depending on my gender (they're trying to be historically accurate here), if I was a woman, my character wouldn't get shit from anyone, but I can still fight for them and rise through the ranks... maybe get some land if we capture any and I was in the battle. If I'm a man, the king will likely give me a fief right off the bat, a small town or something to call my home, where I can do quests for the peasents and generally make their lives better by helping them out or building shit. The better relation I have with the various towns, the more people that will be willing to join me when I'm trying to put together an army.

But first, before I can even join a faction, he'll want me to get some renown, and you do this by killing bandits, winning tournaments and whatever. For the sake of hurrying it up a little though, let's just say I'm a dude, Swadia wants me and I got some land and scrilla.

Swadian king gives me a fief and I go there to recruit some guys. When you pick em up, they suck. They're just conscripts and aren't worth shit in a fight, so you need to train them. You can do this with skills or, the more fun way, battles. The game plays on an overhead campaign map, and you see your guy moving around on the map on his horse. While you're running around, you'll see other people walking around too. Merchants, armies or bandits - bandits is what you want. You jump in on them, converse a little and then you're thrown to battle map. Here, it can be first or third person, though third person is definitely easier (you can't see much of what's going on in first person). Both armies, or groups, start at opposite ends of the field and they run at each other to lay waste.

There are many different types of weapons you can use, and they all have strengths and weaknesses to other types. If you use a two-handed weapon, you will deal a lot of damage, but defending yourself is fairly difficult. With a sword and shield, blocking attacks becomes a lot easier, but you don't do nearly as much damage. With bows and crossbows, you'll have to be patient and practice a lot to hit people, as an arrow will fly just like it would in the real world - hitting people from a great distance can be a challenge, and doing it on horseback is even worse.

You swing your weapon by pulling in any direction and pressing the attack button. If you pull to the left while you press the attack button, your guy will bring his weapon up for a left stroke, if you do it from the right, it's a right stroke, and if you do it from above, it's overhead, etc etc etc. Bows are simply point, aim and shoot, but while you're notching an arrow, the crosshair has to settle, and once it settles at it's most accurate point is when you should loose the arrow. However, if you hold the arrow back too long, you start losing accuracy (imagine trying to hold back a bow that requires 100lbs of force to draw - in the real world, that shit gets tiring fast).

Blocking with a shield is fairly simple, you press the block button and he brings it up. Blocking with a 2handed weapon though is a lot more difficult. It's like how you attack - you move your mouse in a direction, click the attack button to bring his arm that way and release to throw a blow from that way. To block an attack, you have to move the mouse in a direction and press the block key, BUT, you can only block from the direction your enemy swings from. If he does an overhead attack and you do the movements for a block right, he'll hit you. It requires a lot of practice and quick reactions to get right.

So, back to my main man - we rout the bandits, maybe I capture some guys I can sell as slaves or ransom, and I get to check out all the loot they were carrying (including the stuff they had equipped). My soldiers probably got experience, if they survived, and can probably start being leveled up through the Swadian tier and become some true foot soldiers. I level my guys up a bit, grab some gold and shit so I can buy a better weapon and armor for my guy, and then it's probably a good time to start helping my king that probably needs me. Fortunately, you don't have to help him, even if he calls you to help, but it's the best way to get money and land, and having 2000 men at your back (from all of his vassals) is a lot safer than having just yourself and your 10-20 motley crew.

Aside from skirmishes on the field, you can do siege battles, where either some ladders are moved into position, or a siege tower is slowly rolled up. Sieges can be just as much fun, but they'll require a little more caution, as if you get knocked out of the fight, you miss out on all the exp and some of the reward. Depending on how well you do, the king decides who he should give the land to. It probably won't be you since you haven't been doing enough for them, but you'll get yours in time. You can eventually be handed control of castles and cities, which provide different bonuses. Towns (like your fief) mostly just provide a little money and troops, cities provide the most income, and castles are mostly just great defensive fortifications that provide a little bit of everything.

That's actually a pretty accurate description of how this game goes. It's just battle after battle after battle, and they're always fun. Getting money and new gear is a good incentive as well. If you're up to it, though it requires a lot of work, helping one of the claimants to the throne is a lot more rewarding for you as the player, as you have the option to probably become king (if you're a guy), or the military leader with a lot of power. If you were to be in charge of a faction, you would be responsible for handing out land and all that when you're given the opportunity, though it becomes a balancing act of politics - you don't want to give to much to one person, or everyone else will get jealous and pissy.

So that's about it. This is one game you should definitely pick up and try. Despite it's rather aged look, it's an incredibly fun game. There are tons of mods out there too that just make it that much better. One of the best, and most simple, removes the limit of troops there are on the field of battle at any one time, though that has problems of it's own (like if you have 100 and someone has 1000, they'll come in waves, whereas if you make the cap of troops in battle to 1100, all 100 of yours and 1000 of his will be in the battle, which is almost certainly a lost cause). It has a pretty big modding community, so definitely check out the website if you decide to pick it up.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2012, 02:18:35 pm by id »

id

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #23 on: July 05, 2012, 02:15:46 pm »
Space Rangers 2

Space Rangers 2: Reboot Trailer


It's really hard to put a label on this game, because it throws together so many different ideas to make a truly unique experience. It's made by a Russian company, Elemental Games, and was translated by Stardock and added to their Steam-like Impulse program - you can grab it there for relatively cheap. It doesn't come with a manual either, so I'll do my best to explain some basics.

The majority of the game is played out in your ship, where you fly from planet to planet and system to system doing various shit. The story is relatively simple; a highly advanced race of robots, the Dominators (of which there are 3 factions), has taken over the majority of the galaxy. The five races; Humans, Pelengs, Maloqs, Faeyans and Gaalians, work together, for the most part, to push back the Dominators. The character you play is part of a galaxy-wide "Peace corp" called Rangers.

When you start a game, you choose one of the five races, and then a profession. Your race typically only affects your relations with other races; Pelengs usually have strained relations with Faeyans and Gaalians, Humans are usually neutral with all races, and so on. There are five professions, none of which are really limited to what they can do, and basically only affect your starting equipment and also your relations as well. Those are; Fighter, Mercenary, Trader, Corsair, and Pirate. If you pick pirate, your relations with all races are going to be strained a lot more than normal (because you're a fuckin' pirate, man!), but your ship will be equipped with starter gear that makes being a pirate easier, and likewise for all the other classes.

Normally when I play, I play a Trader, because I like flying from system to system, buying low and selling high. It's debatable what the fastest way for making money is, but I've always found that the easiest path. Once you have enough money, you can pretty much equip yourself to do whatever you want anyway.

In addition to picking your race and your profession, you also get to distribute some skill points among the 6 different skills. Those are; Accuracy, Maneuverability, Mechanical, Trading, Charisma, Leadership. You gain experience by completing missions, destroying ships, selling goods (for a profit), or other ways.

Accuracy controls how often you deal the maximum damage of a weapon to an enemy, based on a percentage. No skill points basically means your damage is random. At level one, the percentage increases by 20%, so basically 20% of the time, you'll deal max damage to an enemy.

Maneuverability is the opposite of Accuracy, meaning that it controls how often you receive minimum damage from an enemy. Their accuracy is also factored in and subtracts from your maneuverability, and likewise if you're attacking someone else. If an enemy has 1 accuracy, and you have 1 maneuverability, the two will negate themselves, and he'll have a 0 accuracy against you (so, altogether random damage with no bonus).

Mechanical just basically controls how often you need to repair the wear and tear of the shit on your ship. The more you fly around, your stuff just gets damaged, much like your car - everything just needs a check up once in awhile. It also controls how many active probes you can have out there exploring unpopulated planets.

Trading controls the prices of the shit you sell to people. At it's lowest, you only get 30% in trade-in value on the items you sell, so if something is worth 10,000 credits, you'll only get 3000 for selling it to someone. More skill points increases the cap, up to I believe 80%.

Charisma determines what people will pay you for finishing the various missions you can find in the game. There are many different types, which I'll get in to later.

Finally, Leadership controls how many pilots you can have under your command. I believe you can only recruit other Rangers, but I'm not sure. I think it also affects the cost of hiring pilots to join you. Pilots that are hired only stick around until the end of your contract, or until they die.

So, those are the basics of creating a character. Once you get in the game, you start on a Ranger station. They offer you a tutorial, which you can decline (which is kind of dumb, because you can make some good cash as they show you how shit works), and then you're pretty much left to your own devices for as long as you play the game. This is where I start flying from planet to planet looking for low priced goods that I can sell on other planets for a big return. When I have a good amount of money, I start upgrading my ship components and start fucking things up.

Missions are also a really good way to make cash. These usually take the form of 3 different styles;

1. You're tasked with defending a particular ship, destroying a particular ship, transporting shit, keeping the peace in a system, or whatever else. These take place in space as if you were normally flying around and doing whatever you do.

2. Occasionally, you'll get a mission to drop down on a planet and play a mini-rts game using robots. You design your robots with different parts that have different bonuses, you give them weapons and then you send them out in RTS style to destroy/capture the enemy base(s). There are capture points that give you resources (used to build more robots). You can also take control of a robot and pilot it manually like a FPS. For getting through these missions efficiently, you'll be doing that last part a lot.

3. Text adventures. These can include certain events like getting caught after a crime and sent to Jail (where you're forced to live out your sentence, or come up with ways to escape) or things like taking control of a "Ski Resort" on a planet and making sure it turns a profit. It's like one of those "Choose Your Own Adventure" books, where each choice you make has a consequence. Some are easy, and some are pretty hard, and once you've done one a few times, it starts to get a little repetitive, but for a first timer, they're a lot of fun (if you like that sort of thing).

So, what else... I guess I can break down the different stations. There are a few types, and each provide different things;

Military Stations are where you rank up as a pilot. The higher your rank, there are some options that become available. This is usually just destroying pirates or dominators. They provide basic things like repairing your ship, they have goods that can be bought and sold, and you can give them money to form a squadron that will attack a dominator controlled system. Early on, that's the best way to start liberating territory.

Research stations let you invest in anti-dominator technology. Some of it is required to finish the game, or at least open up alternative ways of defeating the dominator bosses. They can upgrade your equipment (often with two variables, like a weapon; do you want higher damage, or a longer range?). They'll also buy all dominator equipment you find at it's maximum cost, which is a great way to make money.

Business stations let you invest in building other stations, and you can also get info on what the best prices are for buying/selling goods. For a trader, this is pretty important, because it saves you a lot of time from having to jump from system to system and visiting planets to find this out on your own. They'll give you loans as well, but you'll need to be quick about paying it back or the shit hits the fan.

Medical stations provide stims that boost your abilities for a certain period of time, and they'll also cure the random disease you'll pick up here and there (space aids).

Pirate stations are basically your home away from home if you're a pirate. They offer a bunch of shit that would otherwise be unavailable to you since you're probably outlawed on many planets for being a dick.

Ranger stations will rank you up in the Rangers, which is basically your overall score in the game. They'll also let you trade in dominator "nodes" for items that can be used to upgrade your ship equipment (and this is in addition to a research station upgrade on the item - the two stack). They do other shit, but I can't remember it all. It's been awhile since I've utilized all this stuff, and in the game I'm currently playing, the fuckin' dominators blew up the only Ranger station I had. Fuckers.

Eventually, if you lack a Business station, the coalition will throw its own funds together and build stations on their own. This is important, since like in my example, I lost the only Ranger station, and there are no Business stations to get another one built. At some point, the game will throw one in there for you if you lack the means to create it.

Speaking of Dominators, while you're doing whatever it is you decided to do, you'll randomly see dominators invading systems, or vice versa for the coalition. When this happens, it's usually a pretty good idea to join the fight and see where it leads. If the dominators are attacking your worlds, it's possible they'll win and take it over, which sucks. If you see the coalition attacking a dominator controlled system, it's worth it to check it out and see if it's possible to win (sometimes it isn't), or at least try to nab a few items that are floating around in space after a ship was destroyed. Depending on the difficulty you set, dominators can hurt pretty bad, so you'll have to be cautious - at least until you pick up a better ship, shield and weapons.

I guess the last point I hit should be what your ship can carry. There are dozens of different types of ships out there, and they all have their strengths and weaknesses (some only have weaknesses). A fully optimized ship, with every slot open for an item that can be equipped will be;

5 Weapon Hardpoints
Engine; how fast you move and how far you can jump between systems without refueling.
Fuel Container; how many jumps you can make.
Shield; adds an amount of damage reduction to your ship.
Scanner; will let you scan cargoholds, but will also show you the health of a ship as well.
Radar; how far you can see around your ship in space.
Droid; will repair your ship an amount every turn.
Grip; will let you grab shit from space and throw it in your hold.
4 Artifact slots; bonus items that increase certain stats.
Overdrive capability; increase your speed, but damages your engine.

Not every ship you see or have the option of buying will have all of these slots open (though there are a few that will always be there, such as at least 1 weapon slot, an engine, and a fuel container). There are two other other stats, as well;

Hull; this is both your hit points and how much shit you can carry. Every item has a weight, some more than others.
Armor; a small, bonus stat that is basically how much damage you block after each hit. This combines with your shield defense rating.

I may add more information in the future, but this should work for now - or least give you an idea of what to expect. I love this game.

id

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #24 on: July 05, 2012, 02:20:08 pm »
Switching this thread up a bit. I still got a game or two that are part of my top picks, but eventually I'm going to run out. I'll probably run into some in the future and do those, but I'm just going to start hitting up games that I think are just fun regardless.

id

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #25 on: July 05, 2012, 03:17:10 pm »
All Points Bulletin

APB Official Trailer 3


I'll be damned if that video doesn't immediately make you want to go and pick up this game. Every time I watch it, and with that song, I get some serious APB fever. This will probably be the first of many hotly contested titles I review, because I'm sure there are people here that have played it and genuinely didn't like it. But, I don't give a fuck what anyone says about this game - for what it is, it's fun.

I have a funny story about it, too. I had been in to this game long before it came out, and when I started playing it, I was trying to get X-D in on it to (because we played Quake, and this is kind of... well, not really anything like it, but it's a shooter!). They weren't too crazy about it, said shit like "Aw, he'll play it a week or two and then never play it again", and sure, the company that made it ended up going under not to long after its release, and then the game was genuinely considered a failure... BUT! a new company bought the rights, switched it around, changed a few hotly argued about issues and re-released it under the free to play model. Low and behold, those fuckers that thought I wouldn't play it for more than a week should be interested to know that I'm still playing the fucker on occasion, so suck it!

When I hear people say "I want to play a GTA MMO", I say "APB", because that's what it is; it is Grand Theft Auto with up to 100 players in each instance. There isn't much to it. You create a character, you do the tutorial, you get out of the tutorial, talk to a contact and start doing missions for him. Along the way, you may group with people that also want to do missions, and while doing those missions, you may get some opposition. There are two factions; the criminals and the enforcers. Criminals generally just run around, spray paint and blow shit up. The enforcers stop them, though they have some other mission shit they can do... I dunno, I've never played one, because no one wants to be a pussy - it's time to blow shit up, baby!

For me, one of the major attractions of an MMO is the character creator. I am a huuuuge fan of just fiddling around and making characters, though most of the time it just turns into how much effort I can put into making the skankiest, sluttiest looking chick possible, dressing her up with her g-string hanging out, tattoos all over, cigarette burn marks on her forehead... you know, shit like that - and she has to be hot... But, that isn't the only thing (I'm lying), sometimes I care about my appearance. I get this thought in my head about the type of character I want to make, male or female, and I have this great idea of how I want that character to look and I roll with it. Male or female, doesn't matter. This is where APB shines... like a big, bright shining star with a 10 inch jimmy. The character gen in this game is fan-fuckin-tastic, by far the best one I have ever seen an in MMO. When I get home, I'll post a picture of my slut I play the game with.

This isn't really a game you jump in and play 10 hours straight, and you'll probably feel kind of dirty after playing it - feel like you really didn't accomplish anything - but that's okay, because all this game is about is shooting people. That's it. And sometimes, you get in a dump truck and drive 50mph down the street, smashing into everything that gets in your way and watching all the pretty explosions. And when you do this, and the first time you catch someone in a t-bone and watch them go flying, flipping 360's through the air in their shitty mini (if it doesn't explode), you'll laugh your ass off. This game is a joy to play when you just want to fuckin' kill someone. It is not incredibly deep, it's just good ol' entertaining fun with no strings attached - and it's fuckin' free, you can't argue with that.

The game definitely shines with a couple buddies, though. You'll learn real quick that lone wolf run and gun will end up with your face planted firmly in the cement. Camping is actually a viable and valuable tactic for the way the game plays, and utilizing cover is what makes a successful player. This isn't Quake where you can hop around at breakneck speed and still pull off a 180 mid-air rail no problem, this is more of a cover based, tactical shooter, where your life is relatively fragile. Also with the variety and types of vehicles, you can get a bunch of people rolling with you and hanging out your windows blasting - it's a good time waiting to happen.

Each of the weapons has their different strengths and weaknesses - I'll let you figure them all out on your own if you should decide to play. However, the most popular guns are the SMG, Assault Rifle and Sniper Rifle. The SMG, which is called an OCA, or at least in one of it's incarnations, is a mid-range powerhouse, but it can't hit shit at a distance. The Assault Rifle, or NTEC, is a god at long range fire, but suffers in the mid and short range where the OCA rules. And then the Sniper Rifle, which can pop your head like a grape from a distance in one shot, but you move slower than normal when you have it out, so there is very little chance to get away if you get caught with your pants down in close quarters. You can also carry a sidearm, and it's smart to choose one that covers up your weak spot, such as one of the smaller smg pistols (less damage than an OCA) with your Sniper Rifle, so you have something to fall back on that doesn't give you a movement speed decrease and can unload a clip in someone fairly quickly. Alternatively, an OCA user would probably want a pistol that shoots relatively straight and can hit people at a longer distance to cover up the mid/long gap they aren't so good at.

I want to say real quick though; sometimes, there are just unwinnable fights in this game. You're cruising around a city with a lot of buildings. If you don't make it to a certain point before your enemy does, and they know how to utilize your surroundings, the game can be heavily weighed in their favor. It's all about picking the best spot to get the jump on your enemies, and a firmly rooted camper that's a whiz with his sniper rifle will put a lot of hurt on you if you just keep trying to run up to him. Your best bet is to always find another way around and try to surprise him. So, what I'm basically saying is; don't get pissy when you lose, because you don't really get anything for winning. Just keep playing and try to make it fun.

And with that, you pretty much have what the game is about and how it plays. Again, it doesn't require very much thinking, it's just pure unadulterated fun. Jump in for an hour or two and then get back to something important...

Nerds.



« Last Edit: July 05, 2012, 03:23:58 pm by id »

id

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Re: id's Super Fun Video Game Extravaganza Thread
« Reply #26 on: July 14, 2012, 06:17:11 pm »
Played Amnesia a bit. My thoughts are in a previous post. Use the directory to find it.

 

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